Albert Pinsonneault

Conductor Albert Pinsonneault (PEN-son-oh) is Associate Director of Choral Organizations at the Bienen School of Music at Northwestern University, where he directs the University Singers and teaches graduate choral literature. Dr. Pinsonneault is also Artistic Director of the Madison Choral Project, a professional chamber choir in Madison, Wisconsin. Their work has been hailed as “a bundle of pure bliss, unaccompanied choral sound at its most beautiful,” by Madison’s Isthmus newspaper. Additionally, he is Artistic Director of the Madison Chamber Choir, and was formerly Assistant Conductor of the Madison Symphony Chorus and Associate Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities at Edgewood College.

A native of St. Paul, Minnesota, he attended St. Olaf College and the University of Minnesota before completing his doctoral study at the College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) of the University of Cincinnati. His conducting teachers include Anton Armstrong, Earl Rivers, Kathy Saltzman Romey, Richard Sparks, Dale Warland, and Richard Westenburg.

In 2010 Dr. Pinsonneault co-founded the Madison Boychoir Festival, an annual day-festival for 400 young male singers in grades 2 to 12, and in 2008 he was the assistant producer of the Second National Convention of the National Collegiate Choral Organization (NCCO) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Dr. Pinsonneault’s scholarship focuses on choral blend and intonation, the physical/kinesthetic act of conducting, and the music of F. Melius Christiansen. His published work Choral Intonation Exercises is available through Graphite Publishing.


Compositions by Albert Pinsonneault

1: (Easy) No divisi in voice parts, accompaniment doubles or supports vocal parts, diatonic, symmetrical phrases, textures mostly homophonic, simple rhythms, stepwise voice leading (conjunct), moderate ranges, no extended techniques, and limited sustained singing.

2: (Medium Easy) Limited divisi, voices somewhat independent from accompaniment, some chromatics, phrases may be longer or more fragmented, mostly homophonic, moderate rhythmic complexity, some difficult intervals (disjunct motion), moderate ranges, extended techniques are simple, limited sustained singing.

3. (Medium) Limited divisi, unaccompanied, or with independent accompaniment (voice parts not doubled), many chromatics, phrases of varying lengths, more contrapuntal textures, moderately complex rhythms, some difficult intervals (disjunct motion), moderately difficult/challenging ranges, extended techniques are potentially challenging, and some sustained singing.

4. (Medium Difficult) Abundant divisi, unaccompanied, or accompanying instruments are fully independent from voice parts, many chromatics and/or key changes, long and/or broken phrases, potentially little homophony, complex rhythms, many difficult intervals (disjunct motion), difficult/challenging ranges, potentially difficult extended techniques, and a demand for sustained singing.

5. (Difficult) Adundant divis, unaccompanied, or accompanying instruments are fully independent from voice parts, many chromatics and/or key changes, long and/or broken phrases, potentially little homophony, complex rhythms, extreme ranges, use of challenging or unusual extended vocal techniques, abundant sustained singing.