Ola Gjeilo

Ola Gjeilo (pronounced Yay-lo) was born in Norway in 1978, and moved to New York in 2001 to begin his composition studies at the Juilliard School, from which he graduated with a Master’s Degree in ’06, after two years at the Royal College of Music in London.

Ola’s published concert works are performed all over the world, and his debut recording as a pianist-composer, the lyrical crossover album Stone Rose, was released to critical acclaim in 2007 on the 2L label.

He especially enjoys writing music for choir, orchestra/symphonic winds, and the piano, while as a pianist, his main passion is improvisation, either solo or over his own ensemble works.

Presently a full-time composer based in New York City, Ola is also very interested in film, and his style draws much inspiration from movies and cinematic music. Ola’s choral and band scores are distributed by Hal Leonard, and Stone Rose is available at amazon.com and iTunes.

For more information, please visit www.olagjeilo.com.


Compositions by Ola Gjeilo

1: (Easy) No divisi in voice parts, accompaniment doubles or supports vocal parts, diatonic, symmetrical phrases, textures mostly homophonic, simple rhythms, stepwise voice leading (conjunct), moderate ranges, no extended techniques, and limited sustained singing.

2: (Medium Easy) Limited divisi, voices somewhat independent from accompaniment, some chromatics, phrases may be longer or more fragmented, mostly homophonic, moderate rhythmic complexity, some difficult intervals (disjunct motion), moderate ranges, extended techniques are simple, limited sustained singing.

3. (Medium) Limited divisi, unaccompanied, or with independent accompaniment (voice parts not doubled), many chromatics, phrases of varying lengths, more contrapuntal textures, moderately complex rhythms, some difficult intervals (disjunct motion), moderately difficult/challenging ranges, extended techniques are potentially challenging, and some sustained singing.

4. (Medium Difficult) Abundant divisi, unaccompanied, or accompanying instruments are fully independent from voice parts, many chromatics and/or key changes, long and/or broken phrases, potentially little homophony, complex rhythms, many difficult intervals (disjunct motion), difficult/challenging ranges, potentially difficult extended techniques, and a demand for sustained singing.

5. (Difficult) Adundant divis, unaccompanied, or accompanying instruments are fully independent from voice parts, many chromatics and/or key changes, long and/or broken phrases, potentially little homophony, complex rhythms, extreme ranges, use of challenging or unusual extended vocal techniques, abundant sustained singing.